Arcadia High School

When will it stop? — Inside Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School during the shooting

My condolences are with the victims of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School and their families.

On February 14, the sounds of gunshots were heard all across the campus of MSDHS in Parkland, Fla. When it was almost for school to be dismissed, staff and students enacted a “code red” lockdown in response to the sounds.

At 2:30 p.m. ET, 19-year-old Nikolaus Cruz, a former student at MSDHS, was in the institution with a semi automatic rifle. For more than an hour, he was freely roaming the campus with his gun.

screen shot 2018 02 14 at 5 35 16 pm When will it stop? — Inside Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School during the shooting
An overview of the school and the police evacuation route/plan.

 

 

 

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The gun used by Cruz.

 

 

 

What we know about the causalities:

 

  • 17 have died

 

  • Many are in critical condition or are injured

 

 

 

 When will it stop? — Inside Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School during the shooting
Students after being released from the lockdown.

 

15shooting7 1518652080488 master675 When will it stop? — Inside Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School during the shooting

 

 

Firsthand Accounts From Students 

 

According to the LA Times, Hanna Siren was the third floor of the school as she burst into tears as shots are being fired in the class next to her. After safely exiting the premise of the school, she told a reporter that the “people next door to [her] must not have locked their door… they all got shot.”

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A photo taken by a student, hiding in a classroom, during the shooting.

 

 

Andy Pedroza was returning to class when he heard the shots, as reported by the Washington Post. He immediately ran into the boy’s bathroom and hid in a stall. As thoughts were racing through his head, he made the choice to not crouch on the toilet.

“I thought I would make too much noise,” he told the WP. After 20 minutes, he said the shots stopped and the feeling of relief came as he heard a police radio. So Andy took a risk, he sprinted out toward the noise and found salvation.

Jason Snytte was on the first floor where the shots happened first. According to NBC, he noticed their classroom door was open, and after hearing the six distinct shots, he ran and closed it. If he had not, everyone in the classroom would have been exposed to the shooter.

Derval Walton told the NY Post that he was outside when he saw kids running out, bathed in blood, and falling onto the grass.

 

screen shot 2018 02 14 at 5 44 46 pm When will it stop? — Inside Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School during the shooting
A photo from a student’s Snapchat video. You can hear the distinct shots fired in the background. Click here for the video.

 

 

 

180214174939 16 florida high school shooting 0214 exlarge 169 When will it stop? — Inside Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School during the shooting
Students being evacuated from the campus. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
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Grieving parents and guardians waiting for the safe return of their children.

 

Donald Trump tweeted this in response:

 

screen shot 2018 02 14 at 5 31 06 pm When will it stop? — Inside Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School during the shooting

 

I am completely heartbroken. Hearing these stories and watching the video, it jolts me into reality. As long as guns are still sold, this school shooting could easily happen at any one of our schools. The idea of someone entering campus with a fully loaded gun is completely tangible. It is no longer only a fear which lingers in the depths of my nightmares.

 

The Reality

 

According to the Huffington Post, every 63 hours, one school shooting will occur. Every 63 hours, there will be adolescent casualties at the malice hands of gun violence.

1 Comment

  • Reply Donald Zimring February 24, 2018 at 9:28 am

    The tragedy in Florida has tormented me since the first reports came in. As someone who has dedicated his professional life to teaching and the educational process, I am sickened, frustrated, and furious at our seeming acceptance of this “new” normal. So this is what I wrote to various publications. It appeared as an OpEd piece in the Ventura County Star and has been picked up by other outlets and social media. Please feel free to share with any students you know:

    An Open Letter to the Children of Our Community:

    I have spent all of my adult life with one career and one passion – education. I have followed that passion as a teacher, principal, Superintendent, parent and grand-parent. To me there has been no greater reward or more important job than helping someone learn. I am proud of what I and all of the talented people with whom I have worked have done. But tonight, I have to face the brutal truth that despite incredible achievements as a community and country, my generation has failed you.

    Seventeen. They were students and staff. The only reason they weren’t here is that they were somewhere else – this time. The images, the protests, the anguish play like a never-ending loop. Columbine, Sandy Hook, Virginia Tech, San Bernardino, the Pulse night club, Las Vegas, and now Florida. And each time, we the adults, “promise” to make you safe. And each time we find excuses not to.

    So whose problem is this? Our President sends condolences, but never utters the word “gun” in responding to this tragedy and conveniently ignores the fact that he made it easier for people with mental illness to buy weapons. His actions are testimony of his failure to protect you. And seventeen more die.

    Our Congress decries the violence and demands action only to be silenced by the gun lobby and the need not to act “in the heat of the moment”. Following Sandy Hook over 80% of the country supported tougher gun regulations, yet the silence from the majority of the Senate and House became their testimony of their failure to protect you. And seventeen more die.

    And all of us as citizens have the responsibility to vote. We have the responsibility to elect officials who will understand our priorities and act upon them. We then must hold them accountable when they don’t. Our record low voter turnouts are our testimony of our failure to protect you. And seventeen more die.

    Right about now the NRA and its supporters will be on defense, reminding us of the importance of the Second Amendment. To the children of our community – I urge you to heed that call. It’s time for you to learn. Learn about that amendment and our Constitution. It’s a remarkable document. The men who crafted it understood the complexity and challenges of governing. That’s why our Constitution was designed to change and adapt to the times in which we live. It has done so when it ended slavery, gave women the right to vote and guaranteed civil rights to everyone. We now live in a different time.
    It is time for a change again. Our founding fathers saw the critical need for citizens to have the ability to protect themselves through a “well regulated militia”. Nothing in the Constitution guarantees the right to own high powered semi-automatic weapons with bump stocks that can kill more people in a matter of seconds than died in all the opening battles of our Revolutionary War.

    It is time for the next revolution. It is up to each of you, the students and future leaders of our community, to lead the revolt. No other civilized country allows access to these types of weapons as does the U.S. We should have the right to protect ourselves. No one should have the right to create mass murder on a monthly basis. No more students have to die.

    So to each and every student who reads this I urge you to learn. While my generation may have failed you – you and your friends have the power to make a difference. You can do it by making your voices heard. Ask what your parents will do. Ask what your Congress and President will do. Write them. Call them. Be relentless. Use the power of Social Media to make your voices heard. Register to vote and then vote. Demand more of those who represent you.

    You can save the next seventeen.

    Donald M. Zimring, Ph.D.
    Superintendent (retired)
    Las Virgenes Unified School District
    Calabasas, CA.

    Like

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