East Los Angeles Renaissance Academy

A field of legends in East L.A.

Belvedere Park was built in 1942 by the Maravilla community and was called Soledad Park. It was used by Eastern European immigrants in the early days, since then it’s used by the Chicano community.

The park was renamed to Belvedere Park in 1949. It was a big open space for years. The park had north and south sides, and on the north side there were baseball games played and motorcycle races while the south side is where the culture was at. They had festivals, concerts and performances for the families in the area.

In the 1950s, they put in the courthouse and the sheriff’s station, which caused tensions between the police and the local community because they were reducing the area of the park to put these buildings. When things started calming down they divided up the park with the 60 freeway in the 1960’s, which caused more tensions and protest.

The community got over it and kept the park how it was. The north side was still for sports, and the south side for the culture. The north side has been a really big place for baseball. Not a lot of people know but the field they’re playing on now is a really important field for East L.A. Those fields has been home to many great players.

East L.A. used to have the second largest Mexican American league, the first one being in Mexico City. Players that played in East L.A. did go pro to the MLB.

Los Chorizeros baseball was the start of the parks of recreation because they traveled and played at different parks. Games were always played on Sundays. Every team that played in league had loyal fans to go see them play.

Los Chorizeros baseball provided both players and fans a safe and convent form to discus, talk and be together at times if racial discrimination.

The history of Los Chorizo baseball and why Belvedere Park fields are so important.  They provided more than a game, they provided a home for most.

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