Featured

Autism Rocks LA highlights the importance of art in the Autistic community

  On April 29, dozens of people gathered at Universal Studios City Walk to celebrate and support the Autistic community of the greater Los Angeles area. Autism Rocks LA, a first-of-its-kind concert spearheaded by prominent young members of the Autistic community alongside passionate celebrities, brought together an abundance of artistic programs geared specifically towards students with Autism Spectrum…
<a href="https://highschool.latimes.com/author/joeysafchik/" target="_self">Joey Maya Safchik</a>

Joey Maya Safchik

May 4, 2016

 

On April 29, dozens of people gathered at Universal Studios City Walk to celebrate and support the Autistic community of the greater Los Angeles area.

Autism Rocks LA, a first-of-its-kind concert spearheaded by prominent young members of the Autistic community alongside passionate celebrities, brought together an abundance of artistic programs geared specifically towards students with Autism Spectrum Disorders.

The jubilant showcase included performances from Autism Movement Therapy and The Miracle Project, programs that promote inclusion and art-therapy through dance and theatre, and was emceed by teens with Autism, who seized the opportunity to spread respect and esteem for Autistic culture. A particular focus was placed on the creativity and art that is inspired by Autism.

“Creativity is the great equalizer,” said Elaine Hall, founder of The Miracle Project, “kids, teens, young adults with Autism can all share experiences in the arts.”

Hollywood personality Ned Specktor headlined the event, along with American Idol star James Durbin. However, the entire concert is the brainchild of students from the Autistic community, who hope to raise awareness and appreciation for Autism during Autism Awareness Month.

While the concert was completely free, all donations and funds raised in support of the concert are to be donated to The Autism Society of America.

“Autism rocks because it doesn’t matter if you have Autism or a disability. You should be happy for who you are!” said Harlee Davenport, a longtime Miracle Project student who performed on the famous City Walk stage Friday night.