Features

Bullying — ‘Why’ does it happen?

Take a look at these two scenarios: The “popular” kids at school will not let the boy in your chemistry class sit with them at the lunch.  Once high school lovers, now sit on opposite sides of the classroom, anonymously tweet hateful messages about each other through mock accounts on Twitter. Both scenarios, although not physical,…
<a href="https://highschool.latimes.com/author/alexiavoskani/" target="_self">alexiavoskani</a>

alexiavoskani

February 9, 2016

Take a look at these two scenarios:

  1. The “popular” kids at school will not let the boy in your chemistry class sit with them at the lunch.
  2.  Once high school lovers, now sit on opposite sides of the classroom, anonymously tweet hateful messages about each other through mock accounts on Twitter.

Both scenarios, although not physical, are prevailing instances of present day bullying that continues to propagate through high schools all over the nation. Myself, along with many others both younger and older, have witnessed, or even perhaps been personally affected by several variations of bullying. I ask you all now the question – Why?

Simple, it may seem, but in fact it is quite complex. Before I go on to discuss suggested reasons as to why people bully, I feel as if it would be fair to establish a common understanding of what bullying is. Bullying by definition refers to when someone is repeatedly hurt either by words or actions, feels bad because of it, and therefore has a hard time stopping what is happening to them. Why, you may wonder, would one wish such desolation upon another – to that I have no answer.

However, because of various afflicted, unreported cases of bullying, further research has been pushed upon the question, “Why?” As reported by Samuel Ha in the online article, “Why Do People Bully?” the following nine reasons seem to be reoccurring rationale to answer our presented question, “Why?”

1. The bully has been bullied before
2. The bully is lonely
3. The bully has problems at home
4. The bully has low self-esteem
5. The bully is jealous
6. The bully is part of a pack
7. The bully has a big ego
8. The bully likes to impress
9. The bully sees you as being different

Answers from extensive research, yes, but not in any sort justifications to bullying. It has been proven that cruel actions like those present in bully vs. victim situations have caused great psychological effects on both the victim and even greater lasting effects on the bully themselves. However, there is plenty one can do to stop actions like these and decrease the rising number of reported cases of bullying. As a bystander, don’t be afraid to stop things at that moment, because only observing can cause greater damage to all parties of the situation. To both the bully and victim, seeking help from others is the greatest advice others, along with myself have to give you. It is now the time more than ever to put an end to bullying and pay others with the same respect one expects in return. Never be bullied into silence, instead rise with morale!