The Rose Hills Foundation Conservatory for Botanical Science is home to everything green: a tropical rainforest and a cloud forest. The environment inside is humid as plants are constantly sprinkled with water. (Photo by Anneliese Duong)

Features

A San Marino icon: the Huntington Library

The beautiful scenery of the Huntington Library is one to pay attention to.
<a href="https://highschool.latimes.com/author/duonganneliese/" target="_self">Anneliese Duong</a>

Anneliese Duong

December 15, 2021

Filled to the brim with exhibitions, art galleries and gardens, the Huntington Library offers breathtaking and aesthetically pleasing views. See some of what it has to offer.

All photos by Anneliese Duong.

Right as you pass the second ticket check station, there is already so much of the Huntington to explore.

As you walk in deeper past the entrance, a row of statues is one of the first things you see.

The Rose Hills Foundation Conservatory for Botanical Science is home to everything green: a tropical rainforest and a cloud forest. The environment inside is humid as plants are constantly sprinkled with water.

Rainforest facts are displayed across the Conservatory for visitors to read.

At the lowest level, a large lily pond is spotted with fish swimming underneath.

After a short walk, the Chinese Garden is filled with stunning architecture and a blooming landscape to match it.

Visitors can view the glistening water on top of bridges on each side of the pond in the shade.

You can’t go wrong with waterfalls—they’re a staple to all gardens.

With clear skies and good weather, the view from higher up is breathtaking.

Directly next to the Chinese Garden is the Japanese Garden, popular to many tourists for its aesthetic appearance and how vast it is to explore.

Koi fish swim around while visitors rest underneath trees.

Visitors admire the landscape from all areas of the Japanese Garden.

Several types of bonsai trees—which the community donated—are showcased in the Bonsai Courts.

Beautiful autumn leaves are a sight you don’t want to miss.

Smaller bonsai trees lay on different leveled shelves.

Once you exit the Japanese Gardens, you might land at the Australian Gardens, which are packed with bottle trees that look like huge radishes.

The Jungle Garden literally takes you to life in a jungle, presenting many plants that cater to its environment.

On the opposite end of the Chinese and Japanese Garden is a large desert-themed garden.

Pumpkin-shaped golden barrel cacti are packed together all around the garden. There are over 500 and can be over 85 years old.

Small echeveria pallidas and other exotic plants sprout across the desert garden, which is a dream for plant lovers.

Even the exit/entrance of the Huntington is picturesque and urges visitors to want to turn back and keep walking around.

Unfortunately, during my visit, a lot of indoor exhibitions and gardens were closed so I was not able to capture the entire area. Nonetheless, the scenery genuinely makes every visitor fall in love with nature. The Japanese Garden and Chinese Garden were my favorites as the architecture and plants were wonderful and pleasing to the eye.

The Huntington Library is seriously a gem and a place for everyone to love.

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