Golden Valley High School

Our prep zone experience

Tony Moskal, Teacher, Analyst Fox Sports Prep Zone:

Asa teacher I’ve always felt it was my job to expose my students to things theywere interested in and give them the chance to learn about those things. As a broadcaster and a teacher I have thebest of both worlds.  I get to work withyoung people in a field I have a passion for and work with kids who share that same passion. On March 6 and 7 I took five of my students with me to the CIF Basketball Championship games at Azusa Pacific University where they had the chance to see how the entire production works. From my own preparation to my announcing partner, to the guys in the van running cable, setting up monitors, cameras, head sets and whatever else needed to get done, these kids had a first-hand account of the entire production. During the games they were assisting the crew by either pulling cable for the camera guys, helping in the van by running graphics, helping me with stats, or observing what producer, replay person were doing and learning. Here are their first-hand accounts from the weekend.

Nash Soliman:

My dream has always been to find myself a career in the sports media field. On March 6, I got the opportunity to get an idea of what it could be like. I took a trip down to Azusa Pacific for the CIF boys basketball championships, from there I shadowed Fox Sports Prep Zone and got a chance to learn from play-by-play announcers and color analysts. I also got to walk through the production van. I got the full experience of what it’s like to broadcast a game. It was an amazing experience. I got the chance to help out with stats for the play-by-play announcer. He at some points relied on me for those stats during his broadcast, hearing him use my information on air made me that much more excited to pursue this career. I learned what it takes to produce and broadcast a game as Fox Sports Prep Zone was on air.

Nick Herrera:

On Friday March 6, I had the opportunity to go with Mr. Moskal and experience what it is like to see how a whole sports broadcasting production is set up and ran. Mr. Moskal is our sports broadcasting teacher and he broadcasts games for Fox Sports Prep Zone. From the broadcasters preparing before the game, to the camera crew filming, and to the production crew in the van I got to see first-hand how everything comes together. I also had the opportunity to help around with the crew in various areas. Even though it wasn’t the most glamorous job someone had to pull the cable for the camera guys and wind it up.  It was cool sitting in the van and being asked to run some of the graphics for the event. Nik the producer asked me to update the score after each basket as well as start and stop the game clock when the referee signaled. I also saw how the producer calls which cameras to choose. Overall I had a great experience and if I ever had another opportunity to do it again I would.

AJ Sabedra:

On Friday, March 6, I had the pleasure of getting a first person look at what it takes to work in the Fox Sports industry at Azusa Pacific University. My day consisted of watching people in the production truck get ready to make sure the graphics, stats and camera angles are all in place hours before the game. For the broadcasters it was a week long process for preparation. The broadcasters are responsible for contacting the coaches for each team and asking them for their stats, record, key players and any other interesting information that some people might not know. According to Fox Sports analyst and our broadcasting teacher Tony Moskal, that can be one of the easiest as well as most difficult tasks.

“Some coaches are great and get back to you with whatever you need as soon as possible,” Moskal said. “Then there are those who think you’re trying to steal their deepest darkest secrets and won’t give you anything which then makes it difficult to give out correct or any information regarding their player.”

This first person experience is definitely important to a person like me who wants to get in the sports broadcasting industry.  It opened my eyes on what it takes to properly get prepared for a game, what it looks like first hand, and how everyone involved in the preparation of a game does their job.

Brian Bedell:

On March 6 I was lucky enough to go with my teacher Tony Moskal to get an inside look at Fox Sports Prep Zone.  While there I was able to see what happens on and off the camera and how many people it takes to run one game. I spent most of my time in the truck running graphics and watching how much hard work is put into one game. It was a great learning opportunity for me because I want to go into that industry and spend my time in a truck running graphics and controlling what is on the TV. I learned how difficult it is and how much hard work it takes to be successful in this field. I liked spending my time there and I learned a lot about the industry and what I have to do to get into it.

Basheer Qatan:

Although I never thought I would want to be in the sports broadcast industry, this experience opened my eyes to something new. While at the games I felt like I was presented with the chance to feel like was part of the crew. The guys in the truck made it a very special time by showing us what everyone did, what each person was responsible for, how they communicate with each other from the camera guys to the announcers. They showed us how to run the graphics, how to switch cameras, how to do replays. I never knew there was so much involved in putting on a telecast or webcast but this opened my eyes. After watching how everyone did their job, and being a big sports fan, I think it may eventually be an environment I would not mind being around for long periods of time.

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Nick Herrera and Basheer Qatan hanging by the Prep Zone van.
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Nash, AJ and Brian before the crew puts them to work.
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Nick and Basheer working the graphics computer.
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AJ helping out the camera guys.