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The true Powerball prize

As a 18-year-old senior in high school, it’s tough. Why? Because it’s your last year and you have to apply to college. It’s also tough trying to maintain your grades. But one day you hear that the Powerball is worth $1.5 billion. Well, it’s obvious you have to play, but you have an essay that’s due…
<a href="https://highschool.latimes.com/author/jesusb13/" target="_self">Jesus Baltazar - Dominguez</a>

Jesus Baltazar - Dominguez

January 27, 2016

As a 18-year-old senior in high school, it’s tough. Why? Because it’s your last year and you have to apply to college. It’s also tough trying to maintain your grades. But one day you hear that the Powerball is worth $1.5 billion. Well, it’s obvious you have to play, but you have an essay that’s due tomorrow, so you take your chances. That’s what I did and lost, but I did my essay just in case.

What if I won? What if I didn’t do my essay? Clearly, I did do my essay and you’re reading it. But what if I actually won the Powerball? Well, you wouldn’t be reading this. I would have dropped out of school, and start looking at my mother’s bucketlist and mine. I would change my name as well. Probably you’re thinking why change his name? Well it’s obvious, so no one can come and look for me, and ask if they can “borrow” my money.

Besides all my mother’s wishes and mine, I’ll give some money to my niece so she can buy her prosthetic leg, just to see her walk again. I’ll also give her money for college. Giving back is what my mother taught me, so I’ll give $1,000 to each homeless person around my neighborhood and the city of Los Angeles.

I didn’t win the Powerball, but it taught me how to value things. Clearly, the chances of winning the Powerball is 1 in 292,201,338. But is this amount of money really necessary? The only thing that matters is that you have friends and family that you value, and that’s the true Powerball.

Opinion: Inclusive sex ed saves lives

Opinion: Inclusive sex ed saves lives

Sex ed. To most teenagers in the U.S., these words conjure memories of awkward lectures and classmates giggling to hide embarrassment. Maybe sex ed took form in a school-wide assembly, maybe in an online course, or maybe in the span of three classes in 7th-grade...