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Teens of L.A.: Life through the lens

As the saying goes, a picture is worth a thousand words. And 17-year-old Amy Choosanoi can definitely vouch for that. With her Nikon d5300, Choosanoi is well-known through Mark Keppel High School as a talented photographer and videographer. Choosanoi’s passion and talent was highly influenced by her dad, who too, is a photographer. “This passion…
<a href="https://highschool.latimes.com/author/jchauuuuu/" target="_self">Jamie Chau</a>

Jamie Chau

June 5, 2017

As the saying goes, a picture is worth a thousand words. And 17-year-old Amy Choosanoi can definitely vouch for that. With her Nikon d5300, Choosanoi is well-known through Mark Keppel High School as a talented photographer and videographer.

Courtesy of Amy Choosanoi

Choosanoi’s passion and talent was highly influenced by her dad, who too, is a photographer.

“This passion has changed me in multiple ways. Whenever anyone asks me about my passion, they always seem to comment how passionate I am. Maybe it’s because I feel like I can talk about it for hours and hours,” she said.

While not all projects and photos come out the way Choosanoi wants them to, seeing people happy when Choosanoi shares the photos and videos makes up for it.

“It’s amazing when I show a photo or video of them smiling or living the moment and they’re just like, ‘Oh my god, that’s me!’ They just look so happy, like their eyes light up. I think it’s the best– the best feeling ever,” Choosanoi said.

Courtesy of Amy Choosanoi

Most importantly, the photos and videos Choosanoi takes captures the best moments in life.

“I expect that I will be looking back at all these photos and videos and remember exactly how I felt that exact moment. It’s amazing to look back at yourself ten years from now and watch what you were doing with your life,” she said.

Through her lens, Choosanoi experiences everything in her own way.

“I view the world differently.” Choosanoi said. “The little things look beautiful.”

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