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Hollywood Fringe 2015: ‘Treya’s Last Dance’

Fitting in. We have all been in the uncomfortable position of not being able to embrace our individuality. The intolerable feeling inside us usually occurs when we are surrounded by other people who seem quite different than us. Whether this be walking the halls of high school, emigrating to another country, or even going to…
<a href="https://highschool.latimes.com/author/chlopadilla18/" target="_self">Chloe Padilla</a>

Chloe Padilla

June 13, 2015

Fitting in. We have all been in the uncomfortable position of not being able to embrace our individuality. The intolerable feeling inside us usually occurs when we are surrounded by other people who seem quite different than us. Whether this be walking the halls of high school, emigrating to another country, or even going to the grocery store, we have all been in a place of discomfort. In “Treya’s Last Dance”, a one-woman show, the audience is familiarized with the struggles of life, cultural identity, and LGBT related issues.

The main and only character Treya, played by writer and actress Shyam Bhatt, tells a story of the difficulties in life. Treya’s being the suicide of her homosexual brother. Although she explains her own obstacles with love and culture, her brother seems to be the biggest burden of her life. It seemed that he could not live with not being in a socially and culturally acceptable society where he could not be himself. Treya and his parents accepted him, yet their friends and culture did not.

The one-hour show brought awareness to harsh topics in a humorous way, on Friday night at The Hudson Theater in Hollywood.

This story can very well tie into today’s society of being discriminated for being one’s self. Every once in a while we see stories of young people killing themselves over being bullied for their sexuality, or various other things that make up who they are. “Treya’s Last Dance” is a reminder that there is still injustice in the world and that we need to make an effort to be accepting to everyone we meet.

If you or someone you know needs help call the National Suicide Prevention hotline: 1-800-273-8255.

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