A TIME TO CELEBRATE WOMEN- National Women’s History Month highlights the countless contributions women have had in history, science, and society. “We need to start giving space to talk to womxn of all backgrounds,” Ms. Navarro, a biology teacher and ASB adviser, said.
Maywood Center for Enriched Studies

MaCES teachers celebrate National Women’s History Month

In the United States, March is National Women’s History Month — a time meant to acknowledge the immense impact that women have had on American history and to create a space for all women to thrive.

Ms. Navarro, a freshman biology teacher and ASB adviser, stresses the importance of being a role model for her female students.

“My goal is to get more females involved in leadership … I want them to be unapologetically themselves — bright, independent, and capable of … going after their own goals,” Navarro said.

Navarro explains that as a young female teacher, she has always felt an obligation to prove herself to others. However, the challenges she’s overcome throughout her life showcases the determination that she wants to instill in her female students.

“It has always been extremely important to be an example [and] pave the way for other young girls to do the same,” she said. 

Ms. Rincon, a music teacher and band director, believes that the best way to empower women is to change the way we talk about them. “The way we discuss women, the way that we associate and talk to each other, even about each other, can be such a hugely important and pivotal way, to create more representation,” Rincon said. 

She also explains the importance of acknowledging women excelling in their own right — the women who are revolutionizing in their own field. Rincon believes that we, as a society, must begin appreciating the accomplishments of the women who came before us — those who worked to give us the privileges and voice we have today. 

Ms. Camarena, a computer science teacher and 2020 Computer Science Teaching Excellence Award recipient, describes the significance of adopting an intersectional lens when discussing women’s history.  

Often we will find that the events throughout history are connected by the various oppressions,” Camarena said. 

She also believes that in order to encourage girls from Black and Brown communities to pursue competitive fields, like STEM, adequate support systems in schools and communities must be built to uplift historically marginalized people.

She goes on to explain that a girl’s creativity must be nurtured in order to promptly raise female leaders.

“As women, we must break the bonds of competing with each other and embrace the power of the sisterhood because when one wins, we all win,” Camarena said.