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OCSA Faculty Follies: Fun for all!

Shows at OCSA normally feature talented students. But in Faculty Follies, the roles flipped as teachers displayed their talents! Faculty Follies is a rare occurrence; this is the first time in four years where the show has taken place. Perhaps because of this rarity, tickets were sold out–even after additional seats were added. Faculty Follies…
May 11, 2015

Shows at OCSA normally feature talented students. But in Faculty Follies, the roles flipped as teachers displayed their talents!

ocsa night live

Faculty Follies is a rare occurrence; this is the first time in four years where the show has taken place. Perhaps because of this rarity, tickets were sold out–even after additional seats were added.

Faculty Follies was full of a variety of strange talents, but also full of laughter as teachers contradicted their normally buttoned-up personalities. A normally serious teacher sassily lip-synched to Meghan Trainor’s hit “Lips are Movin,” while another group of teachers participated in an intricately choreographed dance number. One teacher demonstrated his unique ability to “Speed Cube,” solving a Rubix Cube in less than a minute.

There were several video clips which proved to be fun to both students and teachers. In one, teachers read pretend mean tweets about themselves. A normally jovial math teacher had nearly every word bleeped out, while other academic and conservatory teachers responded to their stereotypes and jokes.

Another popular video was a parody on “Mean Girls,” called “Mean Girls of the Fifth Floor.” It featured multiple teachers from the fifth floor prancing around in pink boas and tiaras as they recreated the teen classic.

Of course, the laughs for faculty follies was worth it. But there were many other benefits.

One teacher mentioned how he felt like he connected with his students by participating in the rehearsal process. He was able to understand how rushed, sleep-deprived and stressed students felt while they were in tech week, which was a reminder for teachers to sparsely assign homework. Students were able to better connect with teachers after laughing together.

So until next time, Faculty Follies.

Column: Breaking down the uses of lambda

Column: Breaking down the uses of lambda

What is lambda? You may know that it’s the eleventh letter in the Greek alphabet. Perhaps you recall from Physics that it’s the symbol used to represent wavelength in calculations, or you might have heard about it from other places. In C++, a lambda is an expression...