Creative Writing

Personal narrative: Transformation story

I was going into the 7th grade. I was alone in my room when I thought I should write a book. I had never accomplished such a task and I thought it would be easy. I was not as dutifully committed to writing as I originally thought I was. I thought I was prepared to…
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Jerejay

February 29, 2016

I was going into the 7th grade. I was alone in my room when I thought I should write a book. I had never accomplished such a task and I thought it would be easy. I was not as dutifully committed to writing as I originally thought I was. I thought I was prepared to be a writer when in actuality, I wasn’t even remotely close. Then I told myself I was going to write a book. So I told my mom and she suggested I homeschool. She got me into a writing club that was on Wednesdays for about two hours. It really brought my creativity out. Meanwhile my mom got a how to write a novel book step by step book for me. It suggested exercises like why I wanted to write a book, my experience as a writer, and challenges to figure out what I most wanted to write about. By this point I had a good idea about what I wanted to write about. I was engrossed in the Arthurian legends and I wanted to make a remake trilogy of the legend with my own little twists. At first I tried to stick with the legends, which I was not very adequate on. But that wasn’t me and I wanted to make Merlin young and had all these ideas to make it better. I didn’t know it then but I completely went my route, like it had the original stories but most were modernized. My mom thought this was a wonderful idea, considering she has always helped me fulfill my dreams. She told she couldn’t do it for me and that only I could do that but she would be my stepping-stones, helping me along the way. I felt very ready to finally get myself out there and try it. I mean like if starting it was easy then wouldn’t the entire book be? Nope. I was dead wrong.

First, I really got to know my character. I had challenges like getting to know the character, but I didn’t want to; I just wanted to delve into the story, but I’m so glad I took the time to get to know my character. It literally saved me later. I “interviewed” my character and really got to know him and when I didn’t know the answer it would usually pop into my dreams. Most ideas that I have for writing come from my dreams. Then I was finally about to start writing. I felt better after I could finally write my scenes that I had in my head for so long. I mean there was a challenge to write three, free writes on how to start and a few scenes to try, but I was finally ready to put it all down on my notebook paper.

I had a hard time. I got frustrated all the time. Sometimes I felt like my story was worthless. That I wasn’t going to make it. Like my story wasn’t good enough as the books I read. This reflected a lot in the first draft of my book. I got stuck a lot. I was very emotional feeling the story as I was writing it because most was my experiences and how I felt. I got depressed every time I got writers block and once I was stuck for six months I didn’t want to write. I wanted to quit; it was too hard. I was beginning to dislike writing greatly. But it was only my thinking I hated and where the story was going. I loved moving my hand across the paper and see page after page making my story come to life. Then my mom gave me a push and showed me an article in which other writers like me went through this struggle. This empowered me to go on, to finish the book. Sometimes I didn’t want to write but everyday I conditioned myself to at least five pages a day and had my mom check my progress. I don’t know what I would have done without my mom there for emotional support.

I powered on and finished the book. It took me over a year, but I had finally done it! A book! I had finally finished writing a book, my very first. I was excited. This changed me greatly. Writing a book made me stronger emotionally as a person. I am able to think logically and critically. I know what writing really means to me. This experience taught me not only to be quick on my feet and that I wasn’t alone. It also taught me to never give up, and see what rewards I got. If you never give up you will persevere and be the person you were meant to be.

Column: Breaking down the uses of lambda

Column: Breaking down the uses of lambda

What is lambda? You may know that it’s the eleventh letter in the Greek alphabet. Perhaps you recall from Physics that it’s the symbol used to represent wavelength in calculations, or you might have heard about it from other places. In C++, a lambda is an expression...