Opinion

South East students dream $1.5 billion

Three lucky individuals got the lucky jackpot on Jan. 13: $1.5 billion from the Powerball. The winning tickets were sold in Florida, Tennessee, and Chino Hills, Calif. “The amount of money given away was tremendous. I can’t imagine what I would even do with that type of money. Those who won are extremely lucky,” said Jason…
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February 2, 2016

Three lucky individuals got the lucky jackpot on Jan. 13: $1.5 billion from the Powerball. The winning tickets were sold in Florida, Tennessee, and Chino Hills, Calif.

“The amount of money given away was tremendous. I can’t imagine what I would even do with that type of money. Those who won are extremely lucky,” said Jason Franco, a senior in Tech & Media magnet.

Franco believes the Powerball should be won by a low-income person rather than someone of a higher class. He implied that the person who won was already wealthy due to the fact that the ticket was bought in Chino Hills.

Daniel Urias, a senior in Justice, Law & Innovation, disagreed with Franco and declared, “Of course I would like to win but, it simply wasn’t my luck. I can’t blame the winner or hate on him/her because they won and I didn’t. Everyone had a fair chance nevertheless of their income because they all paid the same price for the ticket.”

The $1.5 billion was an extravagant amount of money and students all over campus were visualizing what they would do if they had that amount of money.

“If I were to win the Powerball, I would donate money to homeless people. The amount of homelessness I encounter daily is vast, it blows my mind. I can’t do much without money but with the Powerball, I could make a difference,” said Franco.

“If I won, I would pay for my college tuition and buy a better house. I would appreciate ever penny and not waste it freely,” Urias added.

Many argue that with $1.5 billion a person could be set for life and not have to work a day in their life ever again. However, Diana Herrera, a senior in Tech & Media magnet, said, “I would still pursue my dreams and go to college and try to become successful on my own. Of course, with the money from the Powerball I would be financially stable throughout my life but, I would still like to do something every day and get a fulfilling education. I wouldn’t stop what I’m doing just because I won a lot of money.”

The Powerball became a popular topic due to the amount of money that was being given away. Many discussed what they would do with such money and others simply had no hope in winning. Nevertheless, $1.5 billion was given away.

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