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Be the next guest in space

The first space luxury hotel is set to become a reality in 2021 with an estimated cost of $9.5 million per guest. Only six people will be on the spacecraft at a time, two of those include crew members to help guests have the best stay possible. A guest’s trip will last a total of…
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Laureate

June 2, 2018

The first space luxury hotel is set to become a reality in 2021 with an estimated cost of $9.5 million per guest.

Only six people will be on the spacecraft at a time, two of those include crew members to help guests have the best stay possible. A guest’s trip will last a total of 12 days and will include out of this world attractions such as zero-gravity and being able to view multiple sunsets in 24 hours.

At the Space 2.0 Summit in San Jose, Calif., the new project was announced by the startup company Orion Span. The new space hotel is called Aurora Station. Orion Span believes the hotel will allow guests to have a real astronaut experience for a low cost.

“Our goal is to make space accessible to all. Upon launch, Aurora Station goes into service immediately, bringing travelers into space quickly and at a lower price point than ever seen before,” Frank Bunger, CEO and founder of Orion Span said in a statement.

A normal hotel usually costs anywhere from $100-$500 per night, meaning the Aurora Station is not for average income families.

The hotel is said to orbit the earth every 90 minutes and will be at a height of 200 miles above the earth. For guests, this means they will be able to see many planets in clearer view from telescopes and take part in experiments on board.

Some of the activities offered are growing food while in orbit and being able to fly over their hometown and take pictures from space.

A three-month Orion Span Astronaut Certification (OSAC) program will be mandatory for travelers to complete before take off.

—by Taylor Rico-Pekerol

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