(Photo by Natalie Venable)

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College Board cancels in-person AP exams, switches to at-home format

Recent school closures have left many students wondering what will happen with their AP exams that many have been preparing for since August. The College Board announced Friday, March 20, that in-person AP exam administrations will no longer take place for this school year. Instead, exams will be administered at home in a new format:…
<a href="https://highschool.latimes.com/author/nataliekatevenable/" target="_self">Natalie Venable</a>

Natalie Venable

March 23, 2020

Recent school closures have left many students wondering what will happen with their AP exams that many have been preparing for since August.

The College Board announced Friday, March 20, that in-person AP exam administrations will no longer take place for this school year. Instead, exams will be administered at home in a new format: A 45-minute online free-response exam, excluding material that is generally taught later in the courses. Students can choose one of two testing dates that are to be determined and announced by April 3.

Students will be able to take the exam on their device of choice — smartphone, tablet or computer. Students that are in need of technology or internet access to take the exam can contact the College Board directly on their website.

Colleges will accept the AP exams for credit as they would without the change in format, according to the full update which can be found on the College Board’s AP Central page.

Information regarding the question types for each exam, in particular, will be added to the announcement by April 3. In the meantime, students can view free AP review courses both live and on-demand. The reviews will focus mainly on the first 75% of the course material, as that will be included in the exam.

This testing format will only be in effect for the 2019-2020 school year, according to the College Board.

Column: Breaking down the uses of lambda

Column: Breaking down the uses of lambda

What is lambda? You may know that it’s the eleventh letter in the Greek alphabet. Perhaps you recall from Physics that it’s the symbol used to represent wavelength in calculations, or you might have heard about it from other places. In C++, a lambda is an expression...