El Segundo High School

Ivy League colleges release class of 2020 admissions statistics

unnamed 6 Ivy League colleges release class of 2020 admissions statistics

 

This past week, the eight Ivy League colleges sent acceptance letters to high school seniors around the nation. These kids had average GPAs above 4.0, average SAT scores ranging from 2000-2400; average ACT scores of 30-36.  While the stress of the past months is over, social media has exploded with elation and tears as some received acceptances while others have been declined.

Here are the acceptances by the numbers for each of the eight Ivy League* colleges (and a few other of the most elite colleges in the nation):

Cornell University* (Ithaca, N.Y.) sent acceptances to 13.96% of the applicants; The Big Red accepted 6,277 of 44,966 applicants.

Northwestern University (Evanston, Ill.) sent acceptances to 10.7% of the applicants; the Wildcats accepted 2,690 of 35,099.

Dartmouth College* (Hanover, N.H.) sent acceptances to 10.52% of the applicants; the Big Green accepted 2,176 of 20,675 applicants.

University of Pennsylvania* (Philadelphia) sent acceptances to 9.4% of the applicants; the Quakers accepted 3,661 from 38,918 applicants.

Brown University* (Providence, R.I.) sent acceptances to 9% of the applicants; the Bears accepted 2,919 out of 32, 380 applicants.

Vanderbilt University (Nashville, Tenn.) sent acceptances to 8.8% of the applicants;  the Commodores accepted 2,526 out of 28,700.

Duke University (Durham, N.C.) sent acceptances to less than 8.7% of the applicants;  the Blue Devils accepted 2,501 of the 28,600 regular decision applicants.

Princeton University* (Princeton, N.J.) sent acceptances to 6.46% of the applicants;  the Tigers accepted 1,894 from 29,303 applicants.

Yale University* (New Haven, Conn.) sent acceptances to 6.27% of the applicants;  the Bulldogs accepted 1,972 from 31,455 applicants.

Columbia University* (New York, N.Y.) sent acceptances to 6.04% of the applicants; the Lions accepted 2,193 from 36,292 applicants.

Harvard University* (Cambridge, Mass.) sent acceptances to 5.2% of the applicants;  the Crimson accepted 2,037 of  39,041 applications.

Stanford University (Palo Alto, Calif.) sent acceptances to 4.69% of the applicants;  the Cardinals accepted 2,063 of 43,997 applicants.  Once again, Stanford was the hardest college in the nation to get accepted to!

As many high school juniors across the nation are gearing up to apply to college next year, I am aware of the significance of the achievement of being accepted to an elite college. Congratulations are in order to all who attained such a coveted acceptance letter.  You all are the future brain trust, leaders, innovators of our nation- enjoy the moment!

 

21 Comments

  • Reply JC April 5, 2016 at 4:19 am

    While these stats are useful yo should really offer a breakdown of ED and RD acceptance rates. The RD acceptance rates for all the schools above is between 70-50% of the values above.

    Like

    • Reply Cece Jane April 5, 2016 at 3:32 pm

      I will be writing an article on ED/EA and RD soon. :)

      Like

  • Reply Chris April 5, 2016 at 5:24 am

    “Vanderbilt (Nashville, Tenn.) sent acceptances to 8.8% of the applicants; the Commodores accepted 62,526 out of 28,700.” So selective they had to offer admission to more students who did not apply than who did. Rough.

    Like

  • Reply Bonnie April 5, 2016 at 7:29 am

    If the * identifies the Ivy League schools, you are missing the University of Pennsylvania.

    Like

  • Reply NaTosha April 5, 2016 at 7:52 am

    There must be a typo in regards to the Vanderbilt data.

    Like

  • Reply TheAdventurousTraveler April 5, 2016 at 8:33 am

    Vanderbilt does not make sense.

    Like

    • Reply Joe Iversion April 5, 2016 at 10:48 am

      is 2526

      Like

  • Reply J April 5, 2016 at 9:15 am

    I looked on Vanderbilt’s website and they accepted 2,526 of 28,700 for an 8.8 percent acceptance rate but that doesn’t include early decision.

    Like

  • Reply Adam Schwartz April 5, 2016 at 9:40 am

    They should have included UGA: From the UGA admissions blog:
    • UGA Calculated Grade Point Average mid-range/average: 3.91 – 4.17, with a 4.03 average

    SAT Critical Reading + SAT Mathematics average: 1343

    SAT Writing average: 637

    ACT Composite average: 30

    AP/IB/Dual Enrollment course mid-range/average: 5-10 courses, average of 8

    Like

  • Reply Jeba April 5, 2016 at 9:44 am

    Totally forgot about MIT…

    Like

    • Reply Cece Jane April 7, 2016 at 5:44 pm

      MIT is not an ivy league. This article was specifically written about the ivy leagues.

      Like

  • Reply GERALD O'CONNOR April 5, 2016 at 10:12 am

    Was this article proof read? If so, by a nincompoop

    Like

  • Reply N N April 5, 2016 at 12:19 pm

    Acceptances based on profiles such as family financial, races;not on Academics achievement.

    Like

  • Reply The Cold Facts April 5, 2016 at 12:49 pm

    All this and a bag of chips mean nothing. If you want to be a snot nosed liberal turd go to these so-called schools of higher education. It is not where you get the piece of toilet paper(diploma) Its what you do with it!

    Like

  • Reply Cece Jane April 5, 2016 at 3:33 pm

    The Vanderbilt typo has been corrected, thanks to the keen eyes of the readers! :) Cece

    Like

  • Reply Allen Chatham May 15, 2016 at 3:31 am

    The numbers posted for Northwestern do not add up. 2690 out of 35099 is 7.66% not 10.7%…

    Like

  • Reply Maison-Confort September 3, 2016 at 7:33 am

    There is certainly a great deal to find out about this topic.

    I really like all of the points you’ve made.

    Like

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