(Image courtesy of Bruno Gabriel Bustamante)
Maywood Center for Enriched Studies

Thanksgiving under different circumstances

Time and time again, Thanksgiving has received backlash over its dark history. However, too many Americans, it’s history isn’t the reason why they celebrate it. Thanksgiving has become a holiday when people take the time to appreciate the positive things that happened throughout the year.

Due to the pandemic, people are celebrating Thanksgiving differently this year. Regardless of the changes, people have found things to be thankful for.

COVID-19 brought many changes to people’s lives. As a result, there are new things people have grown to be thankful for this year.

“I am thankful for the people that wear their masks in public and teachers that are trying their hardest to educate us in this pandemic,” Destiny Rodriguez, a senior from Maywood Center for Enriched Studies, said.

COVID-19 changed her mindset on appreciating the little things in her life. Her family always meets during Thanksgiving, but because of the pandemic, they won’t be able to do so this year. However, her family understands it’s for the sake of everyone’s health.

This pandemic has really taught people that valuing one’s own health is very important.

“Although this year has been really rough, I am thankful for still having everyone I care about alive and healthy,” Diego Flores, a junior from Maywood Center for Enriched Studies, said.

For Flores, and many others 2020 was a very rough year, but he’s glad to still have all his friends and family members with him because, unfortunately, a lot of lives were lost this year due to the pandemic. After a rough year, he looks forward to all the food he’ll eat and the smiles he’ll share with his family during this year’s Thanksgiving.

Like Flores, Fermin Pereira, a sophomore from Maywood Center for Enriched Studies, is fortunate to still have his family and friends healthy through the pandemic.

“Due to the pandemic, I’m really most thankful for my health and my family’s health,” Pereira said.

He is really appreciative that the virus has not found its way into his home. Pereira is an example of people who look past Thanksgiving’s history. He likes how the holiday brings people with different views together for one night of the year. Although that might look different this year, he’s happy he’ll have his immediate family at the dinner table.

Not only was 2020 a year of change due to the pandemic, but the U.S. has changed through social activism. More than ever, people are spreading awareness of the racial inequalities happening in the country. One of those people is Ashley Lopez, a freshman from Maywood Center for Enriched Studies, who really liked the change.

“I am thankful this year was a year of change. I really am thankful I grew as a person,” Lopez said.

This year, Lopez has been advocating for change on her Instagram stories by posting different petitions and information on things happening in our country. Like others, she will miss having big family gatherings; she likes to look at the good things that this year has brought her.